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Opinions expressed in International Affairs Review are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of International Affairs Review, The Elliott School of International Affairs, The George Washington University, or any other person or organization formally associated with International Affairs Review.

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Opinions expressed in International Affairs Review are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of International Affairs Review, The Elliott School of International Affairs, The George Washington University, or any other person or organization formally associated with International Affairs Review.

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Article source: http://iar-gwu.org/?hpmpnpo=1848923955

Adelia Homes: “We buy houses in Fort Worth fast with cash” | WebWire

Adelia Homes is buying houses in Fort Worth including damaged, distressed and foreclosure properties. The company guarantees an all-cash offer within just 24 hours of the consultation.

“Unlike real estate agents, we won’t force you into a binding contract. And of course, we do not typically have to wait on buyers to qualify through a bank.” -Joel Allen, Owner

Great news for Fort Worth homeowners struggling to sell their homes. A new local real estate company Adelia Homes is buying all kinds of houses in the DFW area. The company even caters to distressed properties like damaged homes and helps homeowners stop foreclosure.

“If you are having a hard time in selling your home in Fort Worth, Adelia Homes is here to help you. As a “We buy houses Fort Worth” company we will buy any home, regardless of the condition. On top of that, we promise to give you a reasonable ‘all-cash’ offer within 24 hours. We can close on your property in just 7 days or on your timeline,” stated Joel Allen, the owner of Adelia Homes.

Allen is a seasoned real estate professional who has been buying and selling houses in North Texas since 2007.

From unwanted houses to vacant properties to rentals with bad tenants to houses that have fallen behind on mortgage payments- Adelia Homes works with all kinds of sellers and unique situations. If it’s a damaged property, the seller would not be required to take care of the repairs as this can be expensive and a huge hassle.

We buy houses to help homeowners to get out of a bad situation, such as foreclosure. The foreclosure process is the beginning of a 10-year financial nightmare. Adelia Homes can help people stop foreclosure and avoid this devastating road by buying their house or selling it quickly.

The entire process of selling your home with Adelia Homes works in 4 simple steps. First, the homeowner would inform Adelia Homes about their property. Second, the company would verify whether the property fits the buying criteria. If so, Adelia Homes will send a written, fair no-obligation cash offer. If everything is okay, Adelia Homes will close on the property at a local title company and hand over the cash to the seller in as little as 7-10 days.

Adelia Homes is confident that they can sell houses that even a real estate agent can’t. Moreover, Adelia Homes frees the homeowners from all the fees, headaches and waiting time that come with listing a home on the market.

To sell your home with Adelia Homes, fill out the form here www.adeliabuyshouses.com


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(1) (817)-799-8646joel@adeliahomes.com

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CFPB issues rule to give clarity to mortgage servicers on communicating about foreclosures

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued an interim final rule to provide mortgage servicers more flexibility to communicate about foreclosure prevention options with borrowers who have requested a cease in communication.

The bureau also proposed a new rule to provide more certainty for mortgage servicers about when to provide periodic statements to consumers in connection with their bankruptcy case.

“Today’s action should make it easier for mortgage borrowers to receive timely information from their mortgage servicers about available options for saving their home, even if they have submitted a request to cease communication,” CFPB Director Richard Cordray said. “In addition, we are proposing changes to clear up confusion about when to provide periodic statements with important loan information to borrowers in bankruptcy.”

In 2016, the bureau made changes to the mortgage servicing rules to require mortgage servicers to send written notices, referred to as early intervention notices, to certain consumers at risk of foreclosure who have requested a cease in communication under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act.

Under this law, consumers have the option to request that companies stop contacting them except for limited purposes. Once these borrowers become delinquent, the bureau’s 2016 amendments generally require that mortgage servicers send notices to these consumers every 45 days to inform them of available foreclosure prevention options but prohibit servicers from sending the notices more than once in a 180-day period. The bureau has heard concerns that once a servicer sends a notice to one of these borrowers, the rule requires servicers to provide the next notice exactly on the 180th day after the prior one, regardless of whether it is a weekend or a holiday.

To alleviate these concerns, the interim final rule gives servicers a longer, 10-day window to provide the modified notices. The bureau believes that this change offers greater certainty for servicers’ ability to comply with the rule, without undermining important borrower protections. The interim final rule becomes effective on Oct. 19, 2017.

The CFPB has also learned that certain technical aspects of the 2016 amendments regarding the timing for servicers to provide periodic statements in connection with a borrower’s bankruptcy case may create unintended challenges. Thus, the bureau is also seeking public comment on a proposed rule that would provide greater certainty for mortgage servicers regarding the timing for providing periodic statements in those circumstances. The proposed effective date for the proposed rule is April 19, 2018.

The comment period on both the interim final rule and the proposed rule will close 30 days after publication in the Federal Register.

Article source: https://financialregnews.com/cfpb-issues-rule-give-clarity-mortgage-servicers-communicating-foreclosures/

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Article source: http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/news/meet-the-other-atlantic-city-candidates-for-mayor/article_37e84f9f-779c-5bb8-82f2-3a33400f370b.html

CFPB issues interim final rule on mortgage servicer communication

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued an interim final rule to help mortgage servicers communicate with borrowers at risk of foreclosure, updating parts of the final rule published a year ago.

In conjunction with the announcement, the bureau also proposed a rule modifying timing requirements for bankruptcy periodic statements.

As it stands, the CFPB’s final mortgage servicing rule is set to go into effect on Oct. 19.

And, since publishing the rule, the bureau has already put out some implementation guidance for servicers.

The CFPB said earlier this year that it does not intend to take supervisory or enforcement action for violations of existing Regulation X or Regulation Z resulting from a servicer’s compliance with the 2016 Mortgage Servicing Final Rule occurring up to three days before the applicable effective dates.

This new announcement goes beyond implementation guidance and aims to provide mortgage servicers more flexibility and certainty around requirements to communicate with certain borrowers.

When the CFPB announced the final rule, it made changes to require mortgage servicers to send written notices, referred to as early intervention notices, to certain consumers at risk of foreclosure who have requested a cease in communication under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act.

Under this law, consumers have the option to request that companies stop contacting them except for limited purposes, the CFPB explained.

Once these borrowers become delinquent, mortgage servicers are generally required to send notices to these consumers every 45 days to inform them of available foreclosure prevention options but prohibit servicers from sending the notices more than once in a 180-day period.

However, the CFPB said it heard concerns that once a servicer sends a notice to one of these borrowers, the rule requires servicers to provide the next notice exactly on the 180th day after the prior one, regardless of whether it is a weekend or a holiday.

This new announcement addresses those issues. The interim final rule gives servicers a longer, 10-day window to provide the modified notices.

Like the final rule, the interim final rule becomes effective on Oct. 19, 2017. The bureau added that it is seeking comment on this rule and will consider whether to revisit it in the future.

Meanwhile, the CFPB also issued a proposed rule. The CFPB said it learned that certain technical aspects of the 2016 amendments regarding the timing for servicers to provide periodic statements in connection with a borrower’s bankruptcy case may create unintended challenges and be subject to different legal interpretations.

The proposed rule is intended to provide greater certainty for mortgage servicers regarding the timing for providing periodic statements in those circumstances.

The bureau is seeking public comment on the proposed rule, which is proposed to go into effect on April 19, 2018. This is the same date that the sections of the 2016 rule that the proposal would amend become effective.

The comment period on both the interim final rule and the proposed rule will close 30 days after publication in the Federal Register.

 

Article source: https://www.housingwire.com/articles/41485-cfpb-issues-interim-final-rule-on-mortgage-servicer-communication

Detroit council delays action on landlord crackdown

The Detroit City Council on Tuesday delayed a vote to toughen its rental regulations, including a controversial measure that would stop landlords from collecting rent if they don’t pass city inspections.

Under current law, units are supposed to be registered and have passed city inspections, including obtaining a certificate of compliance, before they can be rented out. But city officials admit they have let most landlords ignore the rules for more than a decade.

Councilman Andre Spivey, who introduced the changes in May, said his proposal adds “teeth” to the current law and streamlines regulations for landlords who follow the rules.

But during Tuesday’s session, council President Brenda Jones said she was concerned about the property rights of landlords who wouldn’t be able to evict tenants.

“You are telling me someone can stay in my property,” Jones said. “Even if it’s not up to code, I can’t say anything about you occupying my property. I have a concern with that.

“It’s still my property. You are telling someone to stay in my property rent free because I chose not to fix it up.”

After Jones and two other members voiced concerns, Spivey agreed to send the proposal back to a committee for more discussion.

Several speakers, including members of the Detroit Association of Realtors and Richard Clay of the group People for Utilities Reform, told the council the crackdown would hurt small landlords. Clay predicted rents would rise and other owners would lose their properties to foreclosure.

“Detroit’s small landlords desperately need more financial resources to help them comply with city ordinances and keep them in business instead of more fees and fines to drive them out. A spike in inspection-related fees and fines will cause a further, disastrous decline in black home ownership,” People for Utilities Reform said in a statement.

But supporters said the measures were crucial to making sure all landlords comply with safety regulations, including lead poisoning prevention efforts. Lead inspections are a part of obtaining a certificate of compliance.

“We know of landlords who own 300, 400, 500 properties and never registered their properties,” said Mary Sue Schottenfels, executive director of the nonprofit CLEAR/Corps Detroit, which works to prevent lead poisoning.

In 2015, more than 10 percent of children younger than 6 tested in eight Detroit ZIP codes had elevated blood lead levels.

According to city records, about 4,700 addresses were registered as rentals, as of last month,.

It’s unclear how many rentals aren’t registered, though the U.S. Census Bureau estimates the city has 140,000 rental units. City officials estimate that 50,000 rental properties have not been inspected.

“We aren’t trying to send owners into foreclosure or take rent,” Spivey said. “But we do need safe habitable (homes) for people to stay in.”

After a phase-in period, tenants who live in rentals that haven’t passed city inspections could put their rent in an escrow account for 90 days. The measure aims to stop evictions for non-payment of rent, if the owners haven’t complied with city rules, officials said. Landlords have said the regulation likely would be challenged in court.

cmacdonald@detroitnews.com

Article source: http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/detroit-city/2017/10/03/detroit-council-delays-action-landlords/106282524/

FACT CHECK: Can Hurricane Victims Delay Their Mortgage …

CLAIM

Homeowners affected by hurricanes are allowed, under certain circumstances, to delay their mortgage payments.



TRUE

RATING

TRUE

ORIGIN

After hurricanes Harvey and Irma tore through Mexico, the Caribbean, and the southern United States in September 2017, American government agencies and private mortgage companies offered assistance to homeowners needing to delay their mortgage payments.

A spokesperson for the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, Brian Sullivan, told us on 15 September 2017 that approximately 280,000 Florida homeowners using Federal Housing Administration-insured loans live in counties affected by Hurricane Irma, and that about 220,000 homeowners in parts of Texas damaged by Hurricane Harvey (which made landfall earlier in the month) are currently using FHA loans.

The department has some information on its web site:

If you can’t pay your mortgage because of the disaster, your lender may be able to help you. If you are at risk of losing your home because of the disaster, your lender may stop or delay initiation of foreclosure for 90 days. Lenders may also waive late fees for borrowers who may become delinquent on their loans as a result of the disaster.

FHA borrowers are automatically eligible for a 90-day “foreclosure moratorium”(preventing the start of foreclosure proceedings) in the event of a natural disaster if they or their families live in counties that have been declared a federal disaster area by the government. They are also eligible if:

  •  They are related to someone who was injured or killed, or reported as missing because of the incident.
  •  The disaster “directly or substantially affected” their ability to pay their mortgage.

HUD also advises:

FHA’s Foreclosure Moratorium only applies to borrowers in default. If you are current, you should continue to make your mortgage payment whenever possible. If, however, you are unable to pay your loan as a result of the disaster, your lender may waive any late fees normally charged and let you know about other options.

If their lender is not able to help them, the agency urges borrowers to contact HUD directly for assistance.

Two private mortgage companies, Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, also offer loan deferment programs for customers affected by natural disasters. Borrowers with loans through each company are potentially eligible to pause their mortgage payments for up to 12 months while waiving late fees or risking having a delinquency on their loan reported to credit bureaus.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau also operates a phone line connecting people unsure whether to pursue forbearance (as the practice of suspending a mortgage payment is known) with counselors from HUD. College students using federally-funded loans who are affected by natural disasters like the two hurricanes are potentially eligible for loan forbearance lasting up to 90 days.

Got a tip or a rumor? Contact us here.

Sources:

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. “Disaster Relief Options for FHA Homeowners.”

FEMA. “Texas Hurricane Harvey (DR-4332).”

FEMA. “Florida Hurricane Irma (DR-4337).”

Freddie Mac. “Mortgage Relief for Hurricane Irma.”
7 September 2017.

Fannie Mae. “For Homeowners Affected by Hurricanes Harvey or Irma.”

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. “What Is Forbearance?.”
7 September 2017.

Federal Student Aid. “Natural Disasters: Information for Affected Individuals.”

Article source: http://www.snopes.com/can-hurricane-victims-delay-their-mortgage-payments/

Niagara Falls takes legal step to address ‘zombie’ houses | Local … – Lockport Union

Niagara Falls officials have filed what they say is among the first regional legal claims under a new state law meant to arm governments against the spread of urban blight.

Citizens Bank, which earlier this year was subject to a public shaming campaign led by the Niagara Falls Department of Community Development, was served on Tuesday with a summons to the Niagara County division of state Supreme Court at its offices in Rhode Island and Virginia.

The legal claim is in relation to five Cataract City properties, including: 502 77th St., 8220 Frontier Ave., 8414 Lindbergh Ave., 2444 LaSalle Ave., and 763 16th St.

According to the department’s filing, the houses were inspected and deemed “abandoned” or “vacant” – either left behind by previous owners or otherwise in limbo – waiting for the bank to initiate or complete foreclosure proceedings.

Community Development Director Seth Piccirillo called the structures “unacceptable in Niagara Falls neighborhoods.”

“The Citizens Bank legal complaint is tangible proof of our level of seriousness on zombie properties,” he said.

All of properties named in the filing were publicly identified this summer when the community development department posted signs on the lawns of the homes that read: “How Did This Zombie Get Here? We’re Looking At You, Citizens Bank!”

Under new state legislation, formally known as the 2016 Zombie Property and Foreclosure Prevention Act, the city will have a legal course in an attempt to compel upkeep and collect fines for what the law classifies as “property neglect.”

The signs were placed on July 10 in conjunction with a seven-day notice sent to the bank asking it to join the city in an effort to expedite the foreclosure process. In addition, the notices demanded the vacant properties be brought in compliance with state law and state property maintenance code.

According to the department, “exterior code violations” were identified earlier this summer at all five properties in a review conducted by team members of the Zombie Project Initiative, an endeavor led by coordinator Christine Marino.

The court filing states that the bank has “failed to inspect, maintain or secure the properties sufficiently.” From the time of the July notice to date, 79 days have passed, including weekends. Under the law, that would amount to nearly $39,000 in potential fines.

The tab will continue to grow until a final order on the matter is submitted to state Supreme Court, though the presiding judge in the case could exercise discretion over the sum of the fine.

Marino previously said the department’s intention was to work with the banks in an attempt to address the zombie homes, but those attempts have not proved fruitful.

“The minimal response we have received from Citizens Bank was not solution focused,” she said.

“We stated in our initial letter to Citizens Bank that, per the law, if the properties are not brought to code, it is our responsibility to the community to take legal action, and that is what we are doing, on behalf of our residents,” Marino said.

Marino’s initiative and position are funded through a $250,000, three-year grant from the state Attorney General’s Office, a portion of a $12.6 million cash pot set aside from settlements obtained by the state in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis.

A spokesman for Citizens Bank, Rory Sheehan, said the bank declined to comment on the matter “due to pending litigation.”

The five homes named in the lawsuit represent a small slice of at least 120 zombie homes cataloged thus far by the department.

The city has a pair of other recently acquired tools aimed at stemming blight, including:

• A land bank organization it signed on to earlier this year, which will allow the city to purchase and orchestrate rehabilitation of zombie homes and other vacant properties with a trio of Niagara County’s most populated municipalities. It is also funded with competitive grants through the state AG’s office and

• Ongoing reforms to its annual foreclosed property auction to stop predatory landlords from cyclically purchasing neglected city homes.

Together the aim is, not only to slow the dilapidation in city neighborhoods, but also to find a way to offer them up for sale, thereby increasing property values and the potential for private homeownership in the Falls, officials said.

Article source: http://www.lockportjournal.com/news/local_news/niagara-falls-takes-legal-step-to-address-zombie-houses/article_a6ab8c76-77a6-5b3b-ba80-32f837a59370.html

A Comeuppance for Bank of America?

“Battle-fatigued demoralization,” is how Judge Christopher Klein described the condition of Erik and Renee Sundquist when he fined Bank of America a sweet $45 million for having illegally foreclosed on their home in Lincoln, California. The couple had been in the trenches for more than eight years doing battle with the same Mega-Bank that had led thousands of homeowners down a primrose path to foreclosure, It was all done via smoke and mirrors — a very tricky-dicky maneuver — and the spiel to homeowners desperate for modifications went like this: stop paying your monthly loan payments, don’t send us any more checks, then we’ll consider your for mod. Counter-intuitive, yes, but the Sundquists hoping for a more affordable monthly nut during hard economic times took the bait (they had previously been up-to-date with payments). They quickly found that bait turned into bait and switch. Like thousands of others they fell victim to what’s known as “dual tracking.” On one hand Bank of America officials continued to encourage the couple to apply for a modification — some twenty applications were fielded by the Sundquists — but with a sleight of the other hand Bank of America was quietly rolling out foreclosure’s red carpet. Eventually, the bank got what it wanted: the Sundquist’s home and all the couple got was agita rising to the level of PTSD. Erik Sundquist was sent packing to the hospital with a stress-related heart condition. Renee Sundquist attempted suicide. Judge Klein, reviewing the case, found that the stream of applications proffered by the Sundquists were “routinely either lost or declared insufficient, or incomplete or stale or in need of resubmission or denied without comprehensible explanation.”

Article source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/a-comeuppance-for-bank-of-america_us_597d2675e4b0c69ef70528c5