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Lackawanna offers help for residents facing foreclosure

A Community Resource Fair for Lackawanna residents who may be in danger of losing their homes to foreclosure will be offered from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 1, at St. Anthony’s Church, 306 Ingham Ave.

Free credit reports will be available from the WNY Law Center. Residents can learn how to pay down second and third mortgages with help from the Mortgage Assistance Program. There will be information available on the zombie property contact hotline for those who want to report an abandoned property. Foreclosure information for veterans is expected from the Veterans One-Step Center of Western New York.

ACCESS of WNY, an organization that helps immigrants in the assimilation process, will be there to provide information.

The event is sponsored by the city Department of Planning and Development.

 

Article source: http://buffalonews.com/2017/10/31/lackawanna-offers-help-for-residents-facing-foreclosure/

Memorial mansion under foreclosure, priced at nearly $2.6 million

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This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors


This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.

This Memorial home at 247 Hedwig is currently under foreclosure.


Photo: Houston Association Of Realtors



A grand Memorial mansion is now under foreclosure and available to the public for $2,589,600. 

The residence at 247 Hedwig is a 10,487-square-foot home set on nearly an acre of land in the prestigious Memorial Villages neighborhood.

HOMES WITH HISTORY: River Oaks homes built for iconic Houstonians

A Houston Association of Realtors listing for the property reads: “Buyers, investors, builders, take a look at this home located in the Piney Point area. So much potential.”


A luxurious mansion in the south of France is poised to become the most expensive sale of a residential home in history with a $410 million listing price, according to Bloomberg.


Media: Time


It does seem to be a good value to anyone who can afford to buy it and make at least some cosmetic upgrades (take a virtual tour of the home in the gallery above). 


According to Harris County Appraisal District public records, the home was last appraised at just more than $3 million, with an estimated market value of $3.4 million, in January 2017. Those records also indicate the property boasts a land value of nearly $1.5 million.

The five-bedroom, six-bath estate was built in 1984. It has a swimming pool, fully-equipped summer kitchen and is zoned to Memorial High School.

The house is being marketed by Tracy Slaughter at Nicola Real Estate. 

Article source: http://www.chron.com/neighborhood/memorial/real-estate/article/Memorial-mansion-under-foreclosure-listed-at-12317761.php

Detroit assessor’s plan to save some from tax foreclosure stalls at county treasurer’s office

An effort to help some Wayne County residents from losing their homes to tax foreclosure seems to have stalled. Until the last minute, low-income property owners were being encouraged to apply for tax exemptions, with the hope of preventing their homes from being sold at Wayne County’s annual auction of tax-foreclosed properties.

Detroit City assessor Alvin Horhn’s office promoted the idea that some low-income homeowners might be able to avoid tax foreclosure this year if they hurried to apply for a tax exemption.

Even though the auction wrapped up last week, there had been some hope. If homeowners qualified for an exemption, it was hoped they might be able to keep from losing their house.  

Wayne County Treasurer Eric Sabree seemingly dealt a death-blow to that plan when he reportedly told the Detroit Free Press over the weekend that that deeds to homes sold at the first round of the auction had already been processed.

Sabree said he hadn’t been informed about Horhn’s plan.  

Reached by phone Monday, Sabree said he “didn’t want to comment” on whether some deeds have already been processed.

A delay in processing deeds sold at auction could have given low-income homeowners who applied and qualified for tax-exemptions a chance to keep their homes.

“I knew when we proposed this idea that it was a very long shot given the timing so close to the end of the second auction,” Horhn said in a statement. “I accept the treasurer’s decision that it was too late for this year. We look forward to continuing to work with the treasurer’s office to expand efforts to help residents get the support they need to avoid foreclosure, including poverty tax exemptions.”

A spokesman for Hohrn said he considered the matter over with, and declined an interview to discuss the matter further.

Michele Oberholtzer is the coordinator of the tax foreclosure prevention program at the non-profit United Community Housing Coalition. She says she was helping people apply for tax exemptions even though she knew, through conversations with Detroit city officials, that the effort plan wasn’t a concrete deal.

“We had to act as though it were going to happen, understanding that it wasn’t certain. But we couldn’t allow the opportunity to pass us by … when there was a chance that people could save their homes,” Oberholtzer said.

Oberholtzer said she helped roughly 40 people apply for tax exemptions up through the end of the auction. She said this year’s auction was particularly devastating to her clients. She says of 140 homes owned by her clients, 100 were sold at auction.

“[That] is the lowest ratio that we’ve ever had, and that speaks to the investment and the speculation in real estate in Detroit and the auction in particular that we’re seeing,” Oberholtzer said. “We were very hopeful about this program as a respite and unfortunately it doesn’t look like it will be.”

She says there are numerous steps that governments at all levels, city county and state, could take to help low-income homeowners struggling with property taxes, and avoid future foreclosures.

“Government has the power to change government foreclosure,” she said.

Wayne County put more than 6,000 properties up for auction this year. That’s significantly fewer than in recent years.

Nearly 30,000 properties were withdrawn from the foreclosure process before the auction this year. But critics say most of those people were likely put on payment plans they can’t afford — and the number going to auction is still far too high. Criticisms that a spokesman for Sabree has previously said are unfair

Article source: http://michiganradio.org/post/detroit-assessors-plan-save-some-tax-foreclosure-stalls-county-treasurers-office

Ridgeland officer helps disabled JPD officer pay mortgage

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Officer Jason Rudd saw that former JPD officer David Scott needed $984 to pay his mortgage or he’d lose his house, so Rudd stepped up to help. He had the money donated in three hours.
Jason Rudd Facebook Live

Ridgeland Police Officer Jason Rudd had never met David Scott, a retired Jackson police officer, when he helped him save his house. 

Scott, who had worked for the Jackson Police Department for 31 years, had a stroke in September 2016. Scott and wife Earnestine tried so many things to keep from going under financially, but last week, the bank told him it needed $984 or they would lose their house.

Scott had already lost the job that he loved, his truck, his medical insurance. The family was in dire straits. The Clarion Ledger’s Sarah Fowler wrote about the need, and that’s where Rudd came in. 

“When I read it, I thought about myself and my coworkers, and how everyone is just that close to being in the same shoes if it happened to us,” he said. ”And the article said $984, and I thought to myself that is something I could do for him.”

Rudd posted the link to his Facebook page on Thursday, asking if anyone else wanted to help.

“The article states that his home will be foreclosed on if he doesn’t make a payment on tomorrow, October 27, 2017. I am willing to donate money for this. Who’s willing to help me? His mortgage will be paid tomorrow,” Rudd wrote.

The donations started flooding in. Fellow Ridgeland officers and members of other departments helped. Businesses helped. Individuals stepped forward. Within three hours, the need was filled. More than a half dozen people also contacted the Clarion Ledger on Friday with offers to help.

Rudd had to stop taking donations because he didn’t want to be responsible for more money than he needed to be, but he coordinated with the Jackson Police Officers Association to make it possible for people to donate straight to the mortgage through the association.

“I knew in speaking to the Jackson Police Officers Association, they couldn’t help by that deadline but I could,” he said.

On that day at 3:18 p.m., Rudd made the mortgage payment with the donated funds on Facebook live, with the message, “Be a blessing when you can. #ScottFamily.”

Tonia Louisville-Jones, vice president of the JPOA, said anyone still interested in donating can contact the association. She said it’s important to Scott’s fellow officers that he and his wife be taken care of.

More: Former veteran Jackson police officer facing foreclosure after stroke

“He didn’t want to leave,” she said. “They’re just really having a hard time, so we’re here to help him and his family. He is one of us. We love him.”

About Rudd taking the initiative to care for a fellow officer he’d never met, Louisville-Jones said he was important in getting the ball rolling.

“He saw the article in the newspaper and he ran with it. We appreciate him and Ridgeland Police Department for doing this,” she said.

While police officers are so often proudly their brothers’ keepers, Rudd said it wasn’t a police thing so much as just a human thing.

“Even before ‘the thin blue line,’ I looked at him as a person,” Rudd said. “It’s something that could happen to anyone, and with the amount being so small, I just knew that was something people would help with.”

How to help

If you would like to make a donation for continued support of the Scott family in their mortgage payments, please contact Tonia Louisville-Jones at 769-572-1200.

Article source: http://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/local/2017/10/30/ridgeland-officer-helps-disabled-jpd-officer-pay-mortgage/814780001/

County treasurer: Plan to save occupied sold homes not happening

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Wayne County Treasurer Eric Sabree says residents facing possible tax foreclosure should contact his office by June 30.
Eric D. Lawrence, Detroit Free Press

A plan to keep owners in tax foreclosed Detroit homes sold in the Wayne County Tax Auction is not going to happen, county Treasurer Eric Sabree says.

Last week The Detroit News and Detroit Metro Times reported on an effort spearheaded by Detroit City Assessor Alvin Horhn to keep homeowners in their tax foreclosed homes by urging them to fill out applications for Detroit’s property tax exemption program. If the homeowners were granted a poverty exemption, Horhn told both publications, he would request that Sabree not issue deeds to winning auction bidders on the associated properties. 

When Sabree was approached by a Detroit Free Press reporter Saturday evening at a charity basketball game that he was coaching, however, the county treasurer said he had never been informed about Horhn’s plan and that deeds for round one of the auction had already been sent and deeds for round two were in the midst of being processed.

More: Detroit, Wayne County see dramatic drop in foreclosures

Opinion: We can do something to stop tax foreclosures

“The auction is over, we are getting ready for next year,” he said, adding that he had not received any request from the city to pull occupied houses from the auction. 

News that the treasurer would not consider the assessor’s plan was met with disappointment, but also understanding, from Horhn who sent the Detroit Free Press a statement Sunday evening. 

“I knew when we proposed this idea that it was a very long shot given the timing so close to the end of the second auction,” he wrote. “I accept the treasuer’s decision that it was too late for this year. We look forward to continuing to work with the treasuer’s office to expand efforts to help residents get the support they need to avoid foreclosure, including poverty tax exemptions.” 

While Sabree’s comment and Horhn’s response put an end to speculation around the last-minute plan, for weeks hushed-hushed rumblings of such a deal had sparked hope among housing advocates and homeowners that homes slated for the auction block could be saved. For the past few weeks, since word of such a plan started, organizations, such as United Community Housing Coalition, had been urging clients to fill out the exemption forms — even if they had already lost their home. 

“We’re trying desperately in the last minute for former owners to see if they can get the sale canceled, that’s our Hail Mary because many of these people are low-income and would have qualified for the poverty tax exemption and we have a sliver of hope to think that that could happen,” Michele Oberholtzer of UCHC said Thursday when the plan still seemed a possibility. She noted she had come into work early that morning to fill out a hardship exemption for a woman whose house had been sold earlier that week. 

The organization said they had helped roughly 25 owner-occupants fill out poverty exemption forms in the last couple of weeks, walking people down to the assessor’s office to turn in the forms. The plan was so under wraps and unofficial that when some people went to the assessor’s office to hand in the form on their own they were turned away, according to UCHC. 

Horhn told both the Detroit News and Metro Times that he had sent out a series of letters to occupied homes slated for the auction urging homeowners to fill out poverty exemptions. When, however, the Detroit Free Press knocked, at random, on the doors of five different occupied homes in the auction Thursday, none of the occupants said they had received such a letter. 

Still, despite the seeming chaos, groups like UCHC were operating under an optimism that homeowners had a shot to keep their houses.

The determination by Sabree to move ahead with the processing of the deeds of the houses sold in the auction and not consider such a plan is dispiriting, and also very much a decision, according to UCHC director Ted Phillips. 

“Not having the intention to do so or being willing to is his prerogative, of course, but he would not be violating the law to do it,” Phillips said, noting that the terms of service in entering the auction include a clause about the county’s right to void sales for any reason up to the point they issue a deed. 

“It is within his power to allow people to stay in their homes and keep their homes and if he decides not to that’s his decision, that’s totally on him.”

The hoopla surrounding the last-minute effort raises a series of questions about why such a plan was left to the eleventh-hour, why there was supposedly no communication among the various parties, and more specifically how much discretion and flexibility the city and the county have when deciding what properties do and don’t make it into the auction. 

This year an estimated 6,800 properties were up for the taking in the Wayne County tax foreclosure auction, which ended Thursday. Of that number, roughly 2,000 of the homes were occupied in Detroit; with roughly 800 believed to be owner-occupied homes. 

While the number of occupied homes in the auction has dropped over the years — in 2014, for example, there were nearly 9,000 occupied homes in the auction — those fighting to keep people in their homes argue this is nothing to cheer about. 

“Auctioning occupied homes has become so normalized in Detroit,” said Loveland CEO Jerry Paffendorf, who applied to serve as interim treasurer in 2015 when former Wayne County Treasurer Raymond Wojtowicz stepped down, “that we are celebrating only selling 2,000-some this year.”

Article source: http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/wayne/2017/10/29/wayne-co-treasurer-says-property-tax-exemption-program-not-going-happen/811211001/

Quicken Loans Community Investment Fund launches ‘Neighbor to …

Block clubs and community groups encouraged to join the effort

DETROIT, Oct. 30, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The Quicken Loans Community Investment Fund (QLCIF) has partnered with the United Community Housing Coalition (UCHC) and eight community development organizations to launch an extensive education effort addressing the pervasive issue of tax foreclosure in Detroit. This door-to-door outreach will attempt to reach all 60,000 residential properties behind on property taxes and connect residents at risk of tax foreclosure to resources. Underutilized tools to prevent foreclosure include a property tax exemption for owner occupied homes and an option for disabled veterans. The “Neighbor to Neighbor” program, funded by the QLCIF, is now accepting applications for additional community groups and block clubs to join the peer-to-peer effort and help those at risk of tax foreclosure with the goal of reaching all residents facing this challenge.

“No one organization can do this work alone,” said Laura Grannemann, vice president of investments for the QLCIF. “We need everyone working together to connect Detroit residents with the tools that will keep them in their homes and allow them to continue building equity as the city grows.”

CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW TO GET INVOLVED

Program Background

In May 2017, the QLCIF partnered with UCHC to knock on the doors of 3,300 occupants of Detroit homes facing the 2017 tax foreclosure auction. The outreach effort helped the residents of 2,100 homes ultimately avoid tax foreclosure and remain in their homes.

Due to the success of this work, the QLCIF has announced this $500,000 “Neighbor to Neighbor” fund to expand the work and engage additional local organizations in outreach efforts. Canvassers will be paid hourly out of the QLCIF grant.

The following community groups will participate in the first phase of the rollout:

  • Cody Rouge Community Action Alliance
  • Central Detroit Christian
  • Eastside Community Network
  • Grandmont Rosedale Development Corporation
  • Live6
  • Osborn Neighborhood Alliance
  • Bridging Communities, Inc.
  • Black Caucus Foundation

Other organizations that would like to join the program and receive funding for tax foreclosure awareness outreach should visit foreclosureoutreach.org to fill out an application. Applications will be accepted through Friday, November 10, 2017. A QLCIF representative will respond with next steps.

The Quicken Loans Community Investment Fund is a for-more-than-profit enterprise that has a passion for investing in people and place to open doors to opportunity for Detroiters. This program is the latest addition to the Quicken Loans Family of Companies’ long legacy of supporting solutions to systemic challenges facing Detroit’s neighborhoods, like widespread blight, tax foreclosure, and access to affordable housing.

There are roughly 60,000 homes behind on their property taxes in Detroit. Many of these homeowner’s may qualify for a full or partial property tax exemption. Families facing financial hardship, residents living in poverty and disabled veterans may be eligible to stay in their home.

This program is part of a wider initiative to maintain the integrity of Detroit neighborhoods and ensure Detroiters have the opportunity to build equity as the city continues to grow. Other work includes:

  • Rehabbed Ready—Quicken Loans made a $5 million commitment to rehabbing publicly owned homes in partnership with the Detroit Land Bank to boost home values, increase access to financing, and reactivate Detroit homes.
  • Affordability—Bedrock, a full-service commercial real estate firm within the Quicken Loans Family of Companies, signed an agreement with the City of Detroit committing to dedicate 20 percent of its residential portfolio to affordable housing. This agreement includes the development of new housing, as well as preservation of existing affordable units.
  • Blight Removal Taskforce—Dan Gilbert, founder and chairman of Quicken Loans, co-chaired the Blight Removal Taskforce, which brought stakeholders together to provide resources and leadership toward increasing data access regarding blight, advocating for Hardest Hit Funds, and bringing partners together to address blight in our communities.
  • Renter to Owner—Quicken Loans Family of Companies made it possible for 80 renters to become homeowners this year. Using funds donated by QLCIF, families in these homes facing displacement because their landlords failed to pay property taxes were given an opportunity to purchase their home for $2,500 – $5,500.

About Quicken Loans

Detroit-based Quicken Loans Inc. is the nation’s second largest retail home mortgage lender. The company closed more than $300 billion of mortgage volume across all 50 states between 2013 and 2016. Quicken Loans moved its headquarters to downtown Detroit in 2010, and now more than 17,000 team members from Quicken Loans and its Family of Companies work in the city’s urban core. The company generates loan production from web centers located in Detroit, Cleveland and Scottsdale, Arizona. The company also operates a centralized loan processing facility in Detroit, as well as its San Diego-based One Reverse Mortgage unit. Quicken Loans ranked “Highest in Customer Satisfaction for Primary Mortgage Origination” in the United States by J.D. Power for the past seven consecutive years, 2010 – 2017, and highest in customer satisfaction among all mortgage servicers the past four years, 2014 – 2017.

Quicken Loans was ranked No. 10 on FORTUNE magazine’s annual “100 Best Companies to Work For” list in 2017, and has been among the top 30 companies for the past 14 consecutive years. The company has been recognized as one of Computerworld magazine’s “100 Best Places to Work in IT” the past 13 years, ranking No. 1 for eight of the past 12 years, including 2017. The company is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Rock Holdings, Inc., the parent company of several FinTech and related businesses. Quicken Loans is also the flagship business of Dan Gilbert’s Family of Companies comprising nearly 100 affiliated businesses spanning multiple industries. For more information and company news visit QuickenLoans.com/press-room.

 

Article source: https://michronicleonline.com/2017/10/30/quicken-loans-community-investment-fund-launches-neighbor-to-neighbor-campaign-to-connect-residents-with-tax-foreclosure-resources/

County tells city its plan to save homes is too late

An effort billed last week as a last chance for owner occupants to save their homes from tax foreclosure won’t happen after all.

The News reported on Thursday that in mid-October the city mailed applications for Detroit’s property tax exemption program to owner occupants whose properties were up for auction this month in hopes of finding residents who qualified for the tax break, according to Alvin Horhn, the deputy chief financial officer and city assessor.

Horhn said he was requesting Wayne County Treasurer Eric Sabree not issue deeds to winning auction bidders on properties if the homeowners are granted an exemption. The second round of the controversial auction ended Oct. 26.

But Horhn said in a statement that Sabree’s office has told him that it’s too late to stop the sales.

“I knew when we proposed this idea that it was a very long shot given the timing so close to the end of the second auction,” Horhn said in a statement. “I accept the treasurer’s decision that it was too late for this year. We look forward to continuing to work with the treasurer’s office to expand efforts to help residents get the support they need to avoid foreclosure, including poverty tax exemptions.”

Calls to two spokesmen for the Wayne County Treasurer weren’t returned Monday morning.

Critics fighting tax foreclosures have been frustrated that the treasurer’s office has dismissed last ditch efforts to save homeowners faced with losing their properties. The treasurer’s office has cited their deadlines, saying they want to be fair and consistent.

Sabree last month rejected a $200,000 foundation-funded plan that housing advocates say would have saved a potential 600 owner-occupied homes from this fall’s foreclosure auction because the deadline to get delinquent owner occupants on payment plans had passed.

Tax foreclosures were down countywide this year from 14,300 in 2016 to about 6,800 as of the beginning of the tax foreclosure auctions in September, according to Sabree’s office.

Of those 6,800 properties,788 are believed to be owner-occupied Detroit homes as of mid-August. Another 1,132 are estimated to be occupied by Detroit renters, county officials have said.

cmacdonald@detroitnews.com

313-222-2396

Article source: http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/detroit-city/2017/10/30/county-tells-city-plan-save-homes-late/107163250/

Kim Daniels ministry invokes Irma to stave off foreclosure

In the wake of Hurricane Irma last month, state Rep. Kim Daniels distinguished herself by asserting that “prophets” saw the storm coming.

“Nothing happens except God reveal it to prophets first,” the Jacksonville Democrat observed as the death-dealing superstorm enveloped the peninsula.

God’s revelation apparently has limits, however, and those limits extend to a property owned by one of Daniels’ businesses, Spoken Word Ministries.

The mortgage holder, Freedom Mortgage Corporation, has sought to foreclose on the property since December 2016.

However, those efforts have been successfully forestalled over months. Motions to cancel a sale date have been filed four times — the most recent one, a cancellation of an October sale due to Hurricane Irma, resetting the event to Nov. 8.

Spoken Word Ministries seeks one more cancellation — and, despite the impeccable foresight of prophets in Daniels’ orbit, that cancellation is related to Hurricane Irma.

Spoken Word Ministries needs “time to review damage that the subject property may have sustained,” as well as “potential property insurance issues,” and “eligibility for loss mitigation and other foreclosure avoidance opportunities.”

Though it seems like the prophets may have been able to foresee these issues, and perhaps impose a protective force field around the ministry’s property to protect the parsonage from the storm’s onslaught, the filing does not express that.

Rather, it relies on more quotidian — some might say worldly — exhibits, such as a printout from FEMA asserting that a major disaster declaration was declared.

Left unaddressed in Spoken Word’s filing was how a foreclosure process that was months in the making before the 2017 hurricane season even started should be affected by Irma.

The Davie property was part of an impressive portfolio of parsonages and parson-appropriate vehicles amassed by Spoken Word Ministries, as the divorce filing of Ardell Daniels — the Rep’s now ex-husband — indicated.

Beyond that $860,000 home, the couple acquired other properties, including three Jacksonville homes, a Jacksonville commercial property, and three Central Florida timeshares. The Jacksonville home where Kim Daniels lives was appraised in 2015 at $386,940.

Additionally, Spoken Word Ministries had 13 vehicles, either in the name of the corporation or the husband.

Daniels, meanwhile, maintains impressive earning power; as of her last financial disclosure statement, she made $96,000 from Spoken Word Ministries and just over $100,000 from Kim Daniels Ministries International in 2016.

Daniels’ net worth, per that disclosure document, was just shy of $595,000, with $34,116 in liabilities including two car notes and department store charge cards.

Article source: http://floridapolitics.com/archives/248258-kim-daniels-foreclosure

Farmers and bankers in Huron weigh in on farm foreclosure concerns

Huron, S.D. – Farmers across the region are busy harvesting their crops, but a new report is bringing to light the concern rural bankers have about farm foreclosures. It’s a problem bankers and farmers in Huron said they aren’t seeing and hope they never will.

“It’s really been almost null. I’m not aware of any,” American Bank and Trust CEO and President, Lynn Schneider said.

A study from Creighton University said about 9.5 percent of bank CEOs surveyed from 10 states expect to be greatly impacted by farm foreclosures over the next five years.

“They’re very important customer of Main Street. From the fertilizer, to the elevator, to the feed for their livestock, repairs and the implement dealers and all of that,” Schneider said.

The report also said weak farm income and low commodity prices are adding to the growing concern.

“It’s very disheartening to see that. You should look at your yield monitor and it says 180 bushel of corn and you should say, well I’m going to pay this bill and this bill and this bill. But, now you’re looking at it and you’re just, its going to be tight,” Farmer Mike Brosnan said.

Brosnan said the close relationship he has with his bank helps.

“My personal banker also farms so he understands the struggles that we go through and he knows exactly what’s going on,” Brosnan said.

“You have a lot of responsibility and its just wonderful to have that opportunity to try and help them succeed,” Schneider said.

Brosnan said you learn the most in the hard times.

“You learn nothing in the good times. It’s the hard times. Whether it’s farming or anything in life that you learn from it. It makes you a better person and makes you a better operator,” Brosnan said.

Schneider said there is a possibility out there for farm foreclosures, but there is no way to predict if the impact will be very significant or relatively mild.

Article source: http://www.ksfy.com/content/news/Farmers-and-bankers-in-Huron-weigh-in-on-farm-foreclosure-concerns-454025363.html

Auction.com Launches Platform to Enhance Ohio Foreclosure Sales

Auction.com has announced its new online platform to execute mortgage foreclosure sales of Ohio properties in conjunction with Private Selling Officers (PSOs), which with the signing of Ohio House Bill 390 allows third-party sales to be conducted online.

According to the auction company, “With foreclosure sales now online in Ohio, it is possible for buyers to track whether a property is going to sale, ‘on hold’, or cancelled through email notifications. Sellers can expect their assets to gain greater visibility through Auction.com’s massive marketplace, use of digital advertising network, search engine marketing, geographic marketing and other industry-leading marketing technologies.”

Headquartered in Irvine, California Auction.com is the nation’s largest online real estate transaction marketplace focused exclusively on the sale of bank-owned and foreclosure properties.

“Buyers gain confidence to bid when they have detailed insight into the asset and understand the process,” said Javid Jaberi, EVP of Operations for Auction.com. “House Bill 390 enables buyers to view asset information from their own computer or mobile phone, enabling them to bid on assets completely online from the comfort of their homes or businesses. These resources enable faster transaction timelines, lower holding costs and increased numbers of potential bidders, better ensuring that assets are sold at market price.”

Article source: http://www.themreport.com/headline/10-30-2017/auction-com-launches-platform-to-enhance-ohio-foreclosure-sales