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Md. home foreclosures hit highest level in US – Herald

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Maryland flag



Posted: Thursday, November 26, 2015 7:00 am

Md. home foreclosures hit highest level in US

Maryland had the highest foreclosure rate in the United States in October, with one in every 466 homes affected, which is more than 2.5 times the national rate, according to new figures from a real estate information firm.

A total of 5,126 properties in Maryland had a foreclosure in October, up 100 percent from September, said RealtyTrac, the nation’s leading source for housing data.

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      Thursday, November 26, 2015 7:00 am.

      Article source: http://www.heraldmailmedia.com/news/local/md-home-foreclosures-hit-highest-level-in-us/article_c3515708-93c0-11e5-bdb3-7b8e13f8593a.html

      Development tide rising on St. Simons Island

      By Dan Chapman

      The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

      ST. SIMONS ISLAND (TNS) — It was only a proposal for a gas station along Frederica Road, but it ignited the latest “Oh-my-God-we’re-becoming-another-Atlanta” frenzy in this seaside community favored by sun-seeking refugees from, yes, Atlanta.

      About 400 people turned out for an island planning meeting last winter to oppose The Flash Foods. A follow-up meeting a month later drew a spillover crowd of 500. The gas station didn’t stand a chance. The slow-the-growth crowd smelled blood.

      Glynn County commissioners responded with two successive 90-day construction moratoriums on the island and lower density requirements for builders.

      Still, the fear of overdevelopment rekindled long-smoldering efforts to turn St. Simons and neighboring Sea Island into a standalone city.

      “Incorporation will allow people who live here, who have a vested interest in this place, to make sure the island is the way we want it to be,” said George Ragsdale, an ex-Atlantan who recently retired to St. Simons. “It’s not to stop growth, development or progress. It’s about taking more control. Because, ultimately, if the climate changes people will stop coming here.”

      Ragsdale is leading the incorporation charge, which faces a long haul. It would require legislative approval for a referendum, and then a local vote.

      Ragsdale comes naturally to the task. A decade ago, he led the successful effort to citify Milton in north Fulton County. He said he wants to prevent St. Simons from succumbing to the same over-development woes of Atlanta. “Traffic at Crabapple corners in Milton was horrific,” he said.

      Others see less altruistic motives — keeping out new residents with less money.

      “It’s kind of snooty of them for wanting to keep St. Simons like it is,” said Paul Forsyth, a home inspector from Snellville who moved to the island in 2002. “I’d hate to see too many people come, but who am I to say you can’t come live here?”

      Previous failure

      This isn’t the island’s first incorporation rodeo. A 1996 referendum failed by a wide margin. A straw poll of residents eight years later favored incorporation, but Glynn County’s mainland residents mostly opposed it. Local legislators killed another incorporation push in 2006.

      The recession and its tepid recovery slowed development. St. Simons’ population, 14,846, remains about what it was in 2000. Traffic crossing the Torras Causeway leading onto the island dropped from 30,000 cars daily in 2010 to 23,000 last year.

      And the venerable Sea Island Co., purveyors of upscale home and hotel living accessible only by gated entryway, went bankrupt in 2010. The family-owned resort company controlled huge plots of developed and undeveloped St. Simons land. Employees hailed from every corner of Glynn County. Jones family members were viewed as benevolent dictators and nary a St. Simons development or landscaping decision escaped their typically well-mannered eye.

      “When they left, they left a void,” said Cesar Rodriguez, an ex-Atlanta shopping center developer who has lived on St. Simons since 2001. “When their properties went into foreclosure, the zoning went with it and the new owners developed to standards (that) are not compatible and out of scale with certain areas of the island.”

      As the recovery took hold, land jettisoned by Sea Island Co., including a 2,500-acre tract on St. Simons’ northern end, filled with million-dollar homes. Subdivisions sprouted, or germinated, along Frederica, Demere and Sea Island roads.

      Developers replaced individual homes with condos. Each new development tore at the island’s beloved live oak canopy. By 2015, population and traffic had returned to 2000 heights.

      Traffic jams along the two-lane roads blocked access to subdivisions and shopping, especially during busy summer months. And, still, 8,000 undeveloped lots beckon builders.

      Mainland commissioners

      Ragsdale and others say county commissioners, most from the mainland, saw only property tax dollar signs with every new development.

      “We have a county commission, just like the one in Fulton county, that was not acting in the best interests of the people on the island,” Ragsdale said during a recent windshield tour of the island. “Ultimately, it’s about taking more local control.”

      Glynn commissioners, just as the Flash Foods proposal became a flash point, imposed the successive 90-day moratoriums. They reduced the number of future St. Simons homes from 4 to 2 per acre. In the village, the number of new townhouses per development was slashed from 10 to 5.

      “People come down here and say, ‘Oh, gee, we’ve got the same issues up in Sandy Springs or Dahlonega or Roswell,” said David Hainley, the county’s development director. “If you don’t spend money on infrastructure, you’re going to get some issues. But we’re not the only community that experiences that.”

      In October the sewage pump station on the north end reached capacity. New sewer hook-ups were prohibited except for already sanctioned projects. Two planned subdivisions were postponed. It could be two years before any new developments are approved in the bulldozer-ready north end.

      Second homes

      Hainley estimates 20 percent of the homes on the island are second homes for well-to-do Atlantans and others. Now many of the retiring baby boomers are moving here permanently. And they bring certain expectations.

      “Marietta, Johns Creek, Norcross, Alpharetta — there’s a resurgence going on downtown,” Rodriguez, 70, said. “They’ve gotten control of their planning and zoning. We are so far behind here. I just don’t think the county is equipped to deal with the kind of attention this island requires.”

      Cityhood proponents say local control of zoning, planning and traffic would slow development. They would also have greater control over their money (and maybe incur higher property taxes). Residents of St. Simons and Sea Island account for almost 20 percent of Glynn County’s population, yet cover 60 percent of the county’s tax base.

      Incorporation worries Pat Hodnett Cooper, who owns the island’s largest real estate company.

      “I am against incorporation because it will just make the mainland and the island more divided and we have worked so hard to bring our community together,” she said. “I’m not sure their whole reason for incorporating isn’t to stop development. I would like to see some better ideas about development, but you can’t stop it.”

      The proliferation of townhomes and condos, costing less than standalone homes, dismays some in the cityhood crowd. Density means more people, cars, traffic and demands on water, sewer and roads, they say.

      Double the average

      The average worth of a St. Simons home is $310,732 — more than double the value Georgia-wide. An incorporated St. Simons and Sea Island would create one of the wealthiest cities in the state.

      Scott Steilen, president of the Sea Island Co. — a company renowned for its ocean casual chic where beachfront homesites run to $5.5 million — thinks reasonably affordable housing is needed.

      “If you don’t provide opportunities for young families to move to St. Simons and put down roots and grow, this community will age out and there will be significant problems,” said Steilen, who opposes incorporation.

      He added, “I haven’t met any pro-incorporation folks who aren’t either retired or on the way to retirement.”

      The median age of St. Simons residents is 53.3, vs. 35.9 for the state as a whole.

      “We love our Atlanta folks and, like people from all over, they’ve found St. Simons to be like no other place,” Hodnett Cooper said. “Some, though, think, ‘OK, we found our beautiful retreat and now we don’t want anybody else coming in.’ “

      Article source: http://www.albanyherald.com/news/2015/nov/27/development-tide-rising-st-simons-island/

      Licking County officials working through details after two men shot dead on …

      LICKING CO SHOOTING

      LICKING COUNTY, Ohio (WCMH) — Licking County Sheriff Randy Thorpe says the county coroner will make a definitive determination on the causes of death of two men killed by gunfire on Thanksgiving Day.

      Thorpe says 69-year-old Milton Jarvis showed up at the home of Rick Newman with a gun. He says Jarvis apparently shot Newman, there was a struggle, another shot was fired and Jarvis was dead. Thorpe says it will be up to the coroner to determine whether it was murder-suicide or not. Thorpe says there were several other people in the house at the time.

      Tim Clark, who lives a few doors down from Jarvis, says Jarvis previously worked for Newman Excavating, Rick Newman’s family-owned company. Clark, says he knew both men involved, having attended high school with Newman.

      “There was a few times that Rick rode his motorcycle here,” Clark told NBC4. “He’d even stop and chat with me a minute or so but then he’d go down and see Mr. Jarvis. Whatever their relationship was at that point, I couldn’t tell you.”

      Court records reveal that earlier this week Jarvis plead guilty to low level felony charges of cocaine trafficking. He was placed on three years probation.

      Court records also reveal that Newman and his wife were facing foreclosure on their house earlier this year and had filed for bankruptcy.

      Investigators have not said what they believe the motive was.

      Clark says the whole situation is a total shock.

      “I’m still trying to wrap my head around it,” Clark said. “It doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to me -the whole thing doesn’t.”

      The families of both men declined comment Friday.

      Preliminary findings from the county coroner are expected early next week.

      Article source: http://nbc4i.com/2015/11/27/licking-county-officials-working-through-details-after-two-men-shot-dead-on-thanksgiving/

      Mortgage Attorneys Can Help Homeowner Save Home from Foreclosure

      This press release was orginally distributed by SBWire

      Los Angeles, CA — (SBWIRE) — 11/27/2015 — Mortgage servicing fraud has affected many homeowners in the wake of the financial meltdown and still persists today.  Many mortgage fraud activities are occurring without the awareness of the average homeowner. Common examples include “losing” documents sent by the borrower, denying modifications without adequate review of the application, breaching a valid contract such as a trial modification agreement, and failing to comply with SB900 requirements that protect the homeowner from illegal foreclosure.

      An experienced mortgage attorney will identify the lender’s bad acts such as unnecessary delays in the modification process, or the lender advising the borrower to fall behind, improper modification disqualification, errors with accounting, or failure to provide a permanent modification after a trial modification.  A mortgage attorney will make sure that the lender does not proceed with foreclosure when a modification is in the review process.

      Many homeowners are not aware of loan fraud, as most individuals do not know their rights and the California foreclosure laws that stop lenders from taking advantage of borrowers.  In many cases, borrowers rely on their lenders to provide foreclosure assistance after falling behind on mortgage payments.  Relying on the lenders to help often makes it worse for a borrower who falls further and further behind on mortgage payments while the lender promises to “help”.

      Victims of mortgage fraud are often afraid that they will make it worse by complaining that the lender is causing delay.  Borrowers do not want to complain and risk retaliation by the lender.  What most borrowers do not realize is that they usually make it worse by waiting until it’s too late to take action to stop a lender from foreclosing.

      According to Lauren Rode, the senior mortgage attorney at Consumer Action Law Group, “it’s better to take legal action right away if the lender starts the foreclosure process.”  Borrowers are protected by filing their complaints with a mortgage attorney at Consumer Action Law Group who will provide them with legal assistance and the full force and effect of the law. Ms. Rodes notes that “a good mortgage lawyer will stop any illegal actions taken by the lender in servicing the loan and seek protection under [SB900] the California foreclosure laws.”

      Homeowners can have their day in court through mortgage litigation by enforcing their right to stop the lender from illegally foreclosing on their home.  Consumer Action Law Group is dedicated to providing ligation services for homeowners who facing mortgage fraud; giving them the chance to save their home and stop foreclosure. To this end, the homeowner no longer needs to be intimidated or trampled upon by the lender while foreclosure is threatened by the lender.

      Consumer Action Law Group has highly experienced mortgage lawyers. Hiring a mortgage foreclosure attorney to sue the lender is the best course of action to stop a foreclosure.  Going to court is the best safeguard against illegal foreclosure.  A Consumer Action Law Group mortgage attorney will file a lawsuit or a bankruptcy to stop a foreclosure right away.  California residents facing foreclosure are strongly encouraged to talk to a skilled lawyer with a track record in stopping foreclosures.  The highly experienced mortgage lawyers at Consumer Action Law Group offer free legal advice to homeowners who are facing foreclosure.

      For a free case evaluation, consumers can call (818) 254-8413 or visit http://ConsumerActionLawGroup.com

      About Consumer Law Action Group
      Consumer Law Action Group is a law firm with offices in Los Angeles, dealing with consumer issues such as wrongful foreclosure, auto dealer fraud, and employer violations.  The attorneys within Consumer Law Action Group focus on lender litigation, bankruptcy, and lawsuits against car dealers, as well as claims against employers who violate labor laws.

      For Media Inquiries:
      Contact Person: Lauren Rode, Esq.
      Telephone: (818) 254-8413
      Email: Lauren@consumeractionlawgroup.com
      Website: http://consumeractionlawgroup.com

      For more information on this press release visit: http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/mortgage-attorneys-can-help-homeowner-save-home-from-foreclosure-645054.htm

      Article source: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/2758209

      Maryland foreclosure rates soaring

      November 27th, 2015 by WCBC Radio

      Maryland had the highest foreclosure rate in the United States in October, with one in every 466 homes affected, which is more than 2.5 times the national rate, according to new figures from a real estate information firm. The Hagerstown Herald Mail reports a total of 5,126 properties in Maryland had a foreclosure in October, up 100 percent from September, said RealtyTrac, the nation’s leading source for housing data.

      Article source: http://www.wcbcradio.com/?news=maryland-foreclosure-rates-soaring

      Hotel Utica’s options: New owner or foreclosure



      Posted Nov. 27, 2015 at 12:00 PM


      UTICA

      Article source: http://www.uticaod.com/article/20151127/NEWS/151129513

      Clients with long pending loan modifications that do not stop foreclosure …

      Clients with long pending loan modifications that do not stop foreclosure resort to Chapter 13


      Chapter 13 does not exclude or kill the loan modification process. In fact, Chapter 13 enhances debtor’s chances of successfully resolving her claim of fraud with the bank. Under the worst situation, client can file an adversary proceeding in Chapter 13 to ask the bankruptcy court to rule on her claim of fraud against the bank.

      CLIENT no. 1 presents her long tale of bad news that started when she wanted to refinance her fully paid house 2007. That was the year of what some people call “predatory” lending. Client became a victim of a loan broker who promised her that she was getting a refinance loan at 2 percent per annum fixed for 30 years. Wachovia, which died with the rest of the other lenders like Countrywide and IndyMac, gave her a refinance loan of $400K. She thought she was getting a 2 percent per annum fixed rate loan for 30 years since that is what the loan broker said she would get. But the loan that was given to her was actually an ARM. You know, one with an adjustable rate that fluctuates every six months. After paying her mortgage for two years at $2,400, she thought everything was good. However, all of sudden she gets a notice of default from Wells Fargo, the assignee of the Wachovia loan, saying that her house was going to be foreclosed after 90 days if she did not cure the default of $20K.

      In 2009, the fashion was “sue the banks” for giving you a loan that did not comply with your expectations. A lot of homeowners were actually fooled by unscrupulous lenders who represented to the buyers that, just like my client, that they were getting a really cheap mortgage loan at very low interest. The funny thing was that no matter how diligently and timely they paid their mortgage payments, the balance of the loan kept on getting bigger. Homebuyers then thought, now, that can’t be right. There’s something wrong going on here.

      After investigations conducted by the district attorneys, it was determined that there was a massive fraud perpetrated by the banks on homebuyers. The banks marketed their teaser low rates, which were only good for a specific period of time. When adjustment time came around, most homebuyers were faced with a higher mortgage payment. The banks that got bail out funds were required to settle with the government by forcing them to give loan modifications under HAMP. Sure, some people got sweetheart deals in HAMP, reducing payments, converting ARMS to fixed 30 or 40-year loans, and even reducing principal if your house was upside down. However, many people to this day are still left holding the bag. And since HAMP will end by December 31, 2016, next year, most banks are now reluctant to dole out loan modifications unless there is a very good reason to give one.

      Client has had several lawyers over the years working on a resolution of her claim of fraud. She doesn’t want to sue the bank. All she wants is to have that the bank modifies her loan to 2 percent fixed 30 as what she was promised by the loan broker 8 years ago. However, she has gotten another notice of default, and this time her default is $40K. The right thing to do is file a Chapter 13 to protect the house from foreclosure and continue negotiations on resolving her fraud claim against the bank. Otherwise, she will certainly lose her house to foreclosure even while the resolution of her fraud claim is pending. Certainly, this is not fair or just, but that’s the way the foreclosure process works. Only a Chapter 13 can stop the foreclosure on its tracks. Further, a motion to allow debtor and bank to pursue the loan modification is a standard motion in Chapter 13. Chapter 13 does not exclude or kill the loan modification process. In fact, Chapter 13 enhances debtor’s chances of successfully resolving her claim of fraud with the bank. Under the worst situation, client can file an adversary proceeding in Chapter 13 to ask the bankruptcy court to rule on her claim of fraud against the bank.

      Client no. 2 is almost in the same situation. It’s been a nightmare for her since 2010. That’s when she sold her residence in Orange County and transferred her equity to buy her new residence in Riverside. She became the victim of identity fraud when unknown persons made it appear that she applied and got a HELOC line of credit against her new house in Riverside for $40K. The first mortgage and the HELOC line are with the same bank. Thus, imagine her predicament and frustration when she found out her mortgage payments for the first mortgage, were being used by the bank to pay the 2nd mortgage HELOC, which she never applied for. In effect, her arrears on the first mortgage became bigger and bigger until a notice of default was recorded.

      Again, she retained several lawyers in the last several years to try to get the bank to remove the 2nd mortgage based on fraud and to reinstate the first by applying her payments to the 2nd to the first mortgage. Unfortunately, while negotiations were going on, a foreclosure sale notice was recorded despite the negotiations. So, to stop the foreclosure, client needs Chapter 13. In the 13, she is also going to avoid the 2nd trust deed because her house in Riverside is upside down.

      “The Lord Himself goes before you and will be with you; He will never leave you nor forsake you. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged.” — Deuteronomy 31:8

      * * *

      Lawrence Bautista Yang specializes in bankruptcy, business, real estate and civil litigation and has successfully represented more than five thousand clients in California.  Please call Angie, Barbara or Jess at (626) 284-1142 for an appointment at 1000 S. Fremont Ave, Mailstop 58, Building A-1 Suite 1125, Alhambra, CA 91803.

      (Advertising Supplement)

      Article source: http://asianjournal.com/consumer/clients-with-long-pending-loan-modifications-that-do-not-stop-foreclosure-resort-to-chapter-13/

      Development tide rising on St. Simons Island

      It was only a proposal for a gas station along Frederica Road, but it ignited the latest “Oh-my-God-we’re-becoming-another-Atlanta” frenzy in this seaside community favored by sun-seeking refugees from, yes, Atlanta.

      About 400 people turned out for an island planning meeting last winter to oppose The Flash Foods. A follow-up meeting a month later drew a spillover crowd of 500. The gas station didn’t stand a chance. The slow-the-growth crowd smelled blood.

      +Development tide rising on St. Simons Island photo

      George Ragsdale, a former North Fulton resident, is leading an incorporation effort sparked by recent development plans.


      Glynn County commissioners responded with two successive 90-day construction moratoriums on the island and lower density requirements for builders.

      Still, the fear of overdevelopment rekindled long-smoldering efforts to turn St. Simons and neighboring Sea Island into a standalone city.

      “Incorporation will allow people who live here, who have a vested interest in this place, to make sure the island is the way we want it to be,” said George Ragsdale, an ex-Atlantan who recently retired to St. Simons. “It’s not to stop growth, development or progress. It’s about taking more control. Because, ultimately, if the climate changes people will stop coming here.”

      +Development tide rising on St. Simons Island photo

      Dan Chapman

      Paul Forsyth, a former metro Atlantan who’s lived on St. Simons since 2002, worries that anti-development campaigns seem “snooty.”



      Dan Chapman

      Ragsdale is leading the incorporation charge, which faces a long haul. It would require legislative approval for a referendum, and then a local vote.

      Ragsdale comes naturally to the task. A decade ago, he led the successful effort to citify Milton in north Fulton County. He said he wants to prevent St. Simons from succumbing to the same over-development woes of Atlanta. “Traffic at Crabapple corners in Milton was horrific,” he said.

      Others see less altruistic motives — keeping out new residents with less money.

      +Development tide rising on St. Simons Island photo

      Hyosub Shin

      A beachgoer plays with his dog on the beach in St. Simons Island, whose the easygoing seaside lifestyle has drawn many … read more



      Hyosub Shin

      “It’s kind of snooty of them for wanting to keep St. Simons like it is,” said Paul Forsyth, a home inspector from Snellville who moved to the island in 2002. “I’d hate to see too many people come, but who am I to say you can’t come live here?”

      Previous failure

      This isn’t the island’s first incorporation rodeo. A 1996 referendum failed by a wide margin. A straw poll of residents eight years later favored incorporation, but Glynn County’s mainland residents mostly opposed it. Local legislators killed another incorporation push in 2006.

      +Development tide rising on St. Simons Island photo

      Hyosub Shin

      Evening beach walks are among prime attractions on St. Simons Island. HYOSUB SHIN / HSHIN@AJC.COM




      Hyosub Shin

      The recession and its tepid recovery slowed development. St. Simons’ population, 14,846, remains about what it was in 2000. Traffic crossing the Torras Causeway leading onto the island dropped from 30,000 cars daily in 2010 to 23,000 last year.

      And the venerable Sea Island Co., purveyors of upscale home and hotel living accessible only by gated entryway, went bankrupt in 2010. The family-owned resort company controlled huge plots of developed and undeveloped St. Simons land. Employees hailed from every corner of Glynn County. Jones family members were viewed as benevolent dictators and nary a St. Simons development or landscaping decision escaped their typically well-mannered eye.

      “When they left, they left a void,” said Cesar Rodriguez, an ex-Atlanta shopping center developer who has lived on St. Simons since 2001. “When their properties went into foreclosure, the zoning went with it and the new owners developed to standards (that) are not compatible and out of scale with certain areas of the island.”

      +Development tide rising on St. Simons Island photo

      Hyosub Shin

      A welcome sign for St. Simons Island on Torras Causeway, the main access route to the community. Home values on St. … read more



      Hyosub Shin

      As the recovery took hold, land jettisoned by Sea Island Co., including a 2,500-acre tract on St. Simons’ northern end, filled with million-dollar homes. Subdivisions sprouted, or germinated, along Frederica, Demere and Sea Island roads.

      Developers replaced individual homes with condos. Each new development tore at the island’s beloved live oak canopy. By 2015, population and traffic had returned to 2000 heights.

      Traffic jams along the two-lane roads blocked access to subdivisions and shopping, especially during busy summer months. And, still, 8,000 undeveloped lots beckon builders.

      Mainland commissioners

      Ragsdale and others say county commissioners, most from the mainland, saw only property tax dollar signs with every new development.

      “We have a county commission, just like the one in Fulton county, that was not acting in the best interests of the people on the island,” Ragsdale said during a recent windshield tour of the island. “Ultimately, it’s about taking more local control.”

      Glynn commissioners, just as the Flash Foods proposal became a flash point, imposed the successive 90-day moratoriums. They reduced the number of future St. Simons homes from 4 to 2 per acre. In the village, the number of new townhouses per development was slashed from 10 to 5.

      “People come down here and say, ‘Oh, gee, we’ve got the same issues up in Sandy Springs or Dahlonega or Roswell,” said David Hainley, the county’s development director. “If you don’t spend money on infrastructure, you’re going to get some issues. But we’re not the only community that experiences that.”

      In October the sewage pump station on the north end reached capacity. New sewer hook-ups were prohibited except for already sanctioned projects. Two planned subdivisions were postponed. It could be two years before any new developments are approved in the bulldozer-ready north end.

      Second homes

      Hainley estimates 20 percent of the homes on the island are second homes for well-to-do Atlantans and others. Now many of the retiring baby boomers are moving here permanently. And they bring certain expectations.

      “Marietta, Johns Creek, Norcross, Alpharetta — there’s a resurgence going on downtown,” Rodriguez, 70, said. “They’ve gotten control of their planning and zoning. We are so far behind here. I just don’t think the county is equipped to deal with the kind of attention this island requires.”

      Cityhood proponents say local control of zoning, planning and traffic would slow development. They would also have greater control over their money (and maybe incur higher property taxes). Residents of St. Simons and Sea Island account for almost 20 percent of Glynn County’s population, yet cover 60 percent of the county’s tax base.

      Incorporation worries Pat Hodnett Cooper, who owns the island’s largest real estate company.

      “I am against incorporation because it will just make the mainland and the island more divided and we have worked so hard to bring our community together,” she said. “I’m not sure their whole reason for incorporating isn’t to stop development. I would like to see some better ideas about development, but you can’t stop it.”

      The proliferation of townhomes and condos, costing less than standalone homes, dismays some in the cityhood crowd. Density means more people, cars, traffic and demands on water, sewer and roads, they say.

      Double the average

      The average worth of a St. Simons home is $310,732 — more than double the value Georgia-wide. An incorporated St. Simons and Sea Island would create one of the wealthiest cities in the state.

      Scott Steilen, president of the Sea Island Co. — a company renowned for its ocean casual chic where beachfront homesites run to $5.5 million — thinks reasonably affordable housing is needed.

      “If you don’t provide opportunities for young families to move to St. Simons and put down roots and grow, this community will age out and there will be significant problems,” said Steilen, who opposes incorporation.

      He added, “I haven’t met any pro-incorporation folks who aren’t either retired or on the way to retirement.”

      The median age of St. Simons residents is 53.3, vs. 35.9 for the state as a whole.

      “We love our Atlanta folks and, like people from all over, they’ve found St. Simons to be like no other place,” Hodnett Cooper said. “Some, though, think, ‘OK, we found our beautiful retreat and now we don’t want anybody else coming in.’ “



      At a glance: St. Simons Island

      Where: In Glynn County on Georgia’s coast. Part of the Brunswick metropolitan statistical area.

      Population: About 14,800.

      Average home value: $310,732, about twice the state average.

      Fun fact: Once known as Guadalquini by the Guale Indians, who established a small settlement in about 1500. The island later took its name from San Simon, a “pagan refugee village” on the inland side of the island.

      Source: Staff research, georgiaencyclopedia.org

      Article source: http://www.myajc.com/news/business/development-tide-rising-on-st-simons-island/npTSR/

      68 years later, couple to recreate ‘magical’ honeymoon for $8

      Through Madeline walker Act, RI Housing has helped thousands stay in their homes



      Posted Nov. 26, 2015 at 10:00 PM


      Article source: http://www.providencejournal.com/article/20151126/NEWS/151129444