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Financial Firebird Corporation Launches Home Short Sale Site Intended for …

Short sale of a home provides a way for property to sell even when the value of a house dropped below the level of debt from its outstanding mortgages Individuals now have a new resource for information pertaining to personal alternatives to foreclosure including short sale.

Pittsfield, MA (PRWEB) March 28, 2013

Homeowners with a potential mortgage deficiency have an alternative to foreclosure when they wish to no longer own their home or exhausted all viable options to remain in the house, according to Financial Firebird, who just launched a new web site called Short Sale this week. The site ventures into an area in which individuals rarely qualify as fully informed. Financial Firebird educates these homeowners wishing to stop foreclosure and presents alternatives in instances to owing a mortgage deficiency. The web site provides a plethora of free information on a short sale and how to begin the process, which takes place when a homeowner decides they no longer want to keep the home, yet doesn’t want to lose the house to foreclosure.

“The new Short Sale site encourages individuals to obtain free guidance and education on the subject,” Mory Brenner, vice president of Financial Firebird recently stated. “It stands apart from others because it addresses the real issues at hand. Other sites simply aren’t geared in this way. No matter how much our competitors may attempt to appear that they offer free help, unfortunately, most of the time their motives revolve around enrolling consumers in their own service.”

While a negative equity situation, cases where the mortgages on the home exceed the value, often does lead to a foreclosure, Short Sale targets the individual in search of information to assist them in making the right decision for their particular personal circumstances. Each situation stands as unique, says Brenner, and guiding individuals on the right path serves as our goal.

“We try to maintain an independence not found elsewhere with more information than anywhere else,” Brenner continued. “The result for a consumer may be that other bankruptcy sites and subsequent consultations gear themselves as sales sessions more than learning experiences designed to turn a consumer into a bankruptcy client, sometimes with a high pressure hard sell. Short Sale guides the debtor on the best route. In some cases bankruptcy may be the right solution, but we are just as happy if we explore bankruptcy with them only to determine that it does not meet their needs as well as another answer. “

For some families putting a home up for sale marks a deep and troublesome choice, but in certain instances a good honest assessment reveals that an attempted chapter 13 bankruptcy, modification or other effort to avoid foreclosure would just drain limited cash and delay the inevitable rather than provide a viable long term cure. Even reluctantly, these people may need to move a short sale to the top of their list of alternatives to save time, additional heartache and avoid a mortgage deficiency.

Short Sale’s wealth of information provides clear definitions pertaining to what is a short sale, and its sister sites offer additional assistance and guidance with help to stop home foreclosure, as well as how to obtain a deed in lieu of foreclosure when a short sale fails. Because there are number of ways to stop foreclosure, Financial Firebird’s goal is to provide all of the information up front so that homeowners are able to educate themselves and make the best choice for their situation.

About Short Sale

Short Sale and its sister sites aim to educate people homeowners with a potential foreclosure, and are affiliated with the Financial Firebird Corporation’s Bankruptcy Alternatives Group. The sites provide truly free information web resources with a goal of providing no cost information to consumers, allowing them to make the best decision based on their own individual case.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2013/3/prweb10576564.htm

Article source: http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/Financial-Firebird-Corporation-Launches-Home-4390915.php

Isaiah, a coalition of congregations, reminds us foreclosure crisis is not over

To see such a sight on an ordinary residential street in a spanking new Brooklyn Park subdivision was a bit of a shock: some 20 clergy and their followers carrying a huge cross of rough wood lashed together with rope and studded with nails. While chanting prayers, they lay down their burden on a modern-day Golgotha, the driveway of a four-bedroom, two-and-a-half bath home that had gone into foreclosure after its owner lost his job.

The ceremony was not only an observance of the holy week before Easter but a bit of political theater designed by Isaiah, an interfaith coalition of 100 congregations in the metro and St. Cloud, to prod the state Legislature into passing a bill of rights for people whose houses are in foreclosure.

The cross, says Chris Becker, pastor of Amazing Grace Lutheran Church in Inver Grove Heights, signifies “suffering, rejection, disgrace — what people feel when they are going through foreclosure.”

The gathering was a stark reminder that the tsunami of foreclosures has not ended. Although the seven-county area has seen a drop to 7,500 foreclosures from a peak of about 10,000 in 2010, the number is still three times higher than in 2005, according to reports by HousingLink, a clearinghouse on affordable housing. In Hennepin County, there were 363 foreclosures in the month of January, on track to exceed last year’s total of 4,132.

When it will all subside is anybody’s guess. While home values have stabilized and even increased in some areas, jobs are none too secure; large local employers like SuperValu and Best Buy have announced layoffs of hundreds of workers. The wobbly economy leaves families struggling to repay their bloated mortgages. (Houses in Oxbow Commons, where the clergy marched, are now worth about $100,000 less than when they were purchased six and seven years ago.)

Displaced families

There’s been plenty of documentation of the pain and cost of foreclosure: displaced families, humiliated children, abandoned houses, deterioration of the properties and consequent lower real estate values for other houses in the neighborhood.

But perhaps the biggest outrage is the Kafkaesque process homeowners endured to try to avoid foreclosure: endless paperwork, ever-changing rules and criteria, and anonymous (and also ever-changing) bureaucrats who gave conflicting advice while legal notices of eviction and foreclosure, court dates and seizures continue unabated. Then too, there was the robo-signing scandal; loan servicers hired third-party firms that engaged in the mass production of false and forged mortgage documents created by clerks who didn’t bother to check any of the facts. There were horrifying stories of homeowners who had kept up with their payments going into foreclosure for no reason at all.

Isaiah’s purpose is to get a fairer deal for those who are in danger. So they have been pushing for a law loosely based on a Homeowners Bill of Rights enacted in California last year. The provisions they’re asking for would:

  • Require banks to provide a single point of contact — one human being who is familiar with the homeowner’s loan and is responsible for documents. In the past, homeowners trying to avoid foreclosure had to deal with whoever came on the line. All too often, they would receive conflicting advice and hear that their documents were lost.
  • Ban so-called dual-tracking. As things stand now, even while a homeowner was scrambling to negotiate a delay or temporary modification of payments, the bank can relentlessly proceeded to foreclosure.
  • Allow homeowners to sue banks that violate the ban on dual tracking.
  • Create a mediation program that would force banks and homeowners to have face-to-face conversations about alternatives to foreclosure.

Most of the measures have been incorporated in bills now before the Minnesota Senate and House. The Senate measure languished in the Commerce Committee but survived after members of Isaiah and Occupy MN conducted a sit-in in its offices. Now the bill is awaiting the approval of the Judiciary Committee — minus the mediation provision.

Isaac Russell, legislative assistant to Commerce Committee Chairman Sen. James Metzen, DFL-South Saint Paul, says that there’s little proof that mediation really helps homeowners. “California found that it didn’t stop foreclosures; it just delayed them for a time,” he says.

Unless banks are willing to make concessions on principal or interest rates — and sometimes they are prohibited from doing so by covenants in the securitizations into which most loans were bundled — there isn’t much point to the process.

No vote

Meanwhile, the companion bill in the House has come to a dead halt in the Government Operations Committee. “It never came up for a vote,” says Raymond Dehn, DFL-Minneapolis, one of the bill’s co-sponsors.

“It’s resting,” says Pastor Grant Stevensen of St. Paul Reformation Church Paul and former Isaiah president. Other bills now in the House incorporate some of the provisions that Isaiah advocates, and he adds: “In five years, it will get done.” (My hope: we’ll be done with mass foreclosures by then.)

Stevensen would like to see the mediation piece back in, not necessarily because it will stop foreclosures but because it might “humanize the process.” The problem isn’t so much that banks are relentlessly greedy in pursuing foreclosure, he says. “It’s that any individual homeowner isn’t worth that much to them; they’re write-offs.”

Help has come to people facing foreclosure from a number of quarters. A $25 billion settlement with the five major servicing banks last year (Ally/GMAC, Bank of America, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo, all accused of robo-signing practices) requires everything but mediation. “But the settlement only applies to people whose mortgages are with those banks,” says Norma Garcia, senior attorney and head of Consumers Union’s financial services program. “And the settlement has a brief shelf-life — only three years.”

The new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has also adopted mortgage servicing rules intended to prevent unnecessary foreclosures; it limits banks’ rights to proceed with foreclosure after a homeowner has applied for mitigation, for example. But the regulations do not allow a homeowner to go to court to stop a bank from evicting him and selling the house while he’s pursuing an application for some kind of modification or mitigation.

Says Garcia: “These rights really need to be incorporated into state law.”

Article source: http://www.minnpost.com/cityscape/2013/03/isaiah-coalition-congregations-reminds-us-foreclosure-crisis-not-over

How to Stop Home Foreclosure: The Complete Guide to Saving Your Home and …

Pittsfield, MA — (SBWIRE) — 03/29/2013 — Real-estate-yogi.com is aware of how awful facing foreclosure can be and is offering some suggestions about how to stop the foreclosure process, such as:

- Mortgage Modification
- Refinancing a Mortgage
- Repayment Plan or Forbearance
- Bankruptcy

Modify the Mortgage Loan

One answer to how to stop foreclosure on your home is to talk to the original lender and request mortgage modification. When a mortgage loan is modified, it means that changes are made to the terms of the loan. These changes may be a reduction in principal, lower interest rates, or a longer repayment time. Once any of them are made, it becomes easier for a homeowner to afford his payments, meaning he can retain ownership of his house.

Late on Your Mortgage Payments? Get Professional Help Now. Apply Here!!

Mortgage Loan Refinance

Here is another thought about how to stop home foreclosure: Apply for a refinance. Refinancing a mortgage is similar to modifying it. However, when refinancing, the original loan is totally paid off and a new one is crafted. The point of refinancing is to lower a person’s payments, and many of the same tactics outlined above are used toward that end. To accomplish a traditional mortgage refinance, someone must have good credit, a variable rate loan, and he cannot have defaulted on other debts.

Forbearance or a Repayment Program

How to stop foreclosure? Look into forbearance first. Forbearance usually comes along with loan modification or a repayment plan. What it means is that the lender allows a certain amount of time for a person to get his financial feet under him again. This time period can be from 6 to 12 months and can be just what a homeowner needs. If he makes a repayment plan with the lender, he agrees to pay a certain portion of what’s owed along with his monthly mortgage payment until the past-due amount is eradicated.

File for Personal Bankruptcy

One last thought on how to stop the foreclosure process: file Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Now, most people feel that bankruptcy is as bad as foreclosure, but it really can save someone’s home. Chapter 7 cannot guarantee that s person will keep his home, but it can give him time to make other living arrangements. Chapter 13 is more of a long-term payment plan which can save one’s home.

About Real-Estate-Yogi
Real-estate-yogi.com is a user-friendly website located in Pitts field Massachusetts that provides its service for free. It connects those who need financial or real estate questions answered with the experts in those fields that can supply them. For a complimentary consultation, dial 1-800-987-1397, any time, day or night.

Article source: http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/how-to-stop-home-foreclosure-the-complete-guide-to-saving-your-home-and-your-credit-230368.htm

New York’s Inventory Of Foreclosed Homes Spiked In Q1

The housing market in the Northeast has been one of the slowest to recover. And now we have another worrisome indicator.

New York posted a nearly 130 percent year-over-year surge in foreclosure inventory in the first quarter, according to RealtyTrac’s latest report. This compares with a nine percent rise in overall U.S. foreclosure inventory.

The rise has been attributed in part to New York’s judicial foreclosure process that can last 445 days (15 months).

At 15,212, New York was the fifth largest zombie foreclosure state, in which the owner had vacated the home and moved.

This chart shows the 10 states with the biggest increases in overall foreclosure inventory:

RealtyTrac

Moreover, in New York both listed and unlisted foreclosure inventory were up. The former was driven entirely by an increase in pre-foreclosure sales. Meanwhile, New York’s unlisted foreclosure inventory (where homes are not listed for sale) jumped 129 percent on the year.

RealtyTrac

SEE ALSO: 
12 States Where Homeowners Are Deep Underwater

Article source: http://www.businessinsider.com/new-york-foreclosure-inventory-2013-3

Are you due a foreclosure payment? – U

Borrowers who were in the foreclosure process in 2009 and 2010 may want to watch their mailboxes closely starting mid-April.

Federal officials have sent out postcards to more than 4 million people across the nation to let them know cash is coming their way — part of a $9.3 billion deal between banking regulators and mortgage servicers that settle foreclosure-abuse allegations.

The allegations center on robo-signing, the bank practice of approving loan paperwork with little or no approval.

Did you get a payment letter?

I’d like to talk to you about your experience. Email me at lily.leung@utsandiego.com with your name, city of residence, number and best time to call.

Expected payment amounts range from a few hundred dollars to $125,000, depending on the possible wrongdoing in each case, said the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. A wrongly assessed fee would likely merit the minimum compensation, while a wrongful foreclosure could secure the maximum, a spokesman for the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency said in a previous interview with U-T San Diego.

Consumers did not have to fill out paperwork to receive these payments. Also, by taking the money, borrowers are not waiving their rights to pursue legal cases against those servicers, regulators said.

The settlement, originally pegged at $8.5 billion in January, replaced a costly and lengthy process that let borrowers request free foreclosure reviews. That process encountered a host of issues, from lack of participation to drawn-out review processes. Regulators got a total of 495,000 requests out of 4 million-plus solicitations. At least 56,000 of those came from San Diego County.

Related: Foreclosures linger at 6-year low

The new deal involves $3.6 billion in cash payments and the rest in mortgage assistance to people whose primary homes were at any point of the foreclosure process and whose loans were serviced by any of these companies:

America’s Servicing Company, Countrywide, PNC Mortgage, Aurora Loan Services, EMC Mortgage Corporation, Saxon Mortgage, BAC Home Loans Servicing, Goldman Sachs, Sovereign Bank, Bank of America, HFC, SunTrust Mortgage, Beneficial, HSBC, U.S. Bank, Chase, Litton Loan Servicing, Wachovia Mortgage, Citibank, MetLife Bank, Washington Mutual, CitiFinancial, Morgan Stanley Wells Fargo Bank, CitiMortgage, National City Mortgage and Wilshire Credit Corporation.

Borrowers will likely get letters from Rust Consulting, Inc., the consultant hired by regulators, within the next three to seven weeks. Others may be asked to provide tax information before a payment can be sent.

If you have questions on the settlement, call Rust Consulting at (888) 952-9105. If you want to read more about the foreclosure settlement, visit occ.gov/independentforeclosurereview.

Email me: lily.leung@utsandiego.com | Tweet me: @LilyShumLeung. | Facebook me. | Subscribe to this blog.

Article source: http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2013/mar/28/foreclosure-review-payments-robosigning-cash/

Foreclosure rate spikes as homes come to market

(MoneyWatch) The “shadow inventory” of homes at risk of foreclosure is finally starting to hit the market, raising concerns that a flood of properties for sale could lower home prices and hinder the housing recovery.

These homes include properties with delinquent mortgages but that aren’t yet in the formal foreclosure process. Foreclosure rates are up about 9 percent from last year, according to market researcher RealtyTrac. That jump is almost entirely attributable to shadow, or pre-foreclosure, inventory, which increased 59 percent over last year.

By contrast, homes in other stages of foreclosure has decreased. The number of homes scheduled for foreclosure auction was down 25 percent, while the inventory of bank-owned homes decreased 3 percent. So the foreclosure rate that is typically tracked — where the bank has seized a home and that ignores pre-foreclosure properties — is down. It’s that shadow inventory that is keeping overall foreclosures up.

This glut of homes heading to foreclosure was bound to hit the market. They have been stuck in limbo in recent years, as government regulations change how banks and mortgage servicers handle foreclosures.

“Delinquent loans that fell into a deep sleep after the robo-signing controversy in late 2010 are gradually coming out of hibernation following the finalization of the national mortgage settlement in April 2012,” said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac, in a statement. “The settlement provided some closure regarding accepted foreclosure processing practices, and as a result lenders have been reviving more of these delinquent loans and pushing them into foreclosure over the past 12 months, particularly in states where a lengthy court process has resulted in a bigger backlog of non-performing loans still in snooze mode.”

Foreclosures peaked at more than 2.2. million in December 2010 before steadily decreasing to a five-year low of 1.3 million in May 2012, down 29 percent from the peak.

As the total number of foreclosures was falling, a federal settlement was struck last year forcing the five largest U.S. banks to make reparations to borrowers who lost their homes or were otherwise affected by shady mortgage servicing practices. These included things like robo-signing, where banks fraudulently signed documents legally required to foreclose on a home.

Along with that came new mortgage servicing rules from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, effectively pushing pause on foreclosures while banks figured out their obligations under the law.

The banks are now again gearing up on foreclosures. In a market where price increases are being driven by low inventory, it is likely that these new homes, about 200,000 in all so far, will cause home price fluctuations when they are put up for auction. But they haven’t so far, and it’s possible they won’t. Inventory is limited right now, just as home buyers are showing up for the big spring season.

“The good news is that it is a relatively short-term trend, because delinquency rates on newer loans are going down,” Blomquist said in an e-mail.

“Still,” he warned, “it will likely play out for the next 18 months.”

Article source: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505145_162-57576665/foreclosure-rate-spikes-as-homes-come-to-market/

House committee approves mortgage foreclosure bill – Sarasota Herald

The measure (HB 87) won approval from the House Judiciary Committee on a 12-6 vote Thursday in its last committee stop before a looming vote in the full House.

Rep. Kathleen Passidomo, R-Naples, says her bill is aimed at unclogging the foreclosure process in a state that’s been swamped by foreclosures.

Passidomo says the bill offers guarantees to make sure that borrowers with a “meritorious defense” will be heard in court.

One provision added to the bill would allow judges on senior status to hear foreclosure cases.

The bill proposes several changes to the procedures governing foreclosures in Florida.

Surveys indicate that Florida still has about a quarter of the nation’s foreclosures.

Article source: http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20130328/APN/1303280899

Financial Firebird Corporation Launches Home Short Sale Site Intended for …

  • Email a friend

Short Sale to Avoid bankruptcy Or Foreclosure

Bankruptcy Alternatives And Personal, Debt Credit and Finance Help

Short sale of a home provides a way for property to sell even when the value of the home has dropped below the debt from its outstanding mortgages.

Pittsfield, MA (PRWEB) March 28, 2013

Homeowners with a potential mortgage deficiency have an alternative to foreclosure when they wish to no longer own their home or exhausted all viable options to remain in the house, according to Financial Firebird, who just launched a new web site called Short Sale this week. The site ventures into an area in which individuals rarely qualify as fully informed. Financial Firebird educates these homeowners wishing to stop foreclosure and presents alternatives in instances to owing a mortgage deficiency. The web site provides a plethora of free information on a short sale and how to begin the process, which takes place when a homeowner decides they no longer want to keep the home, yet doesn’t want to lose the house to foreclosure.

“The new Short Sale site encourages individuals to obtain free guidance and education on the subject,” Mory Brenner, vice president of Financial Firebird recently stated. “It stands apart from others because it addresses the real issues at hand. Other sites simply aren’t geared in this way. No matter how much our competitors may attempt to appear that they offer free help, unfortunately, most of the time their motives revolve around enrolling consumers in their own service.”

While a negative equity situation, cases where the mortgages on the home exceed the value, often does lead to a foreclosure, Short Sale targets the individual in search of information to assist them in making the right decision for their particular personal circumstances. Each situation stands as unique, says Brenner, and guiding individuals on the right path serves as our goal.

“We try to maintain an independence not found elsewhere with more information than anywhere else,” Brenner continued. “The result for a consumer may be that other bankruptcy sites and subsequent consultations gear themselves as sales sessions more than learning experiences designed to turn a consumer into a bankruptcy client, sometimes with a high pressure hard sell. Short Sale guides the debtor on the best route. In some cases bankruptcy may be the right solution, but we are just as happy if we explore bankruptcy with them only to determine that it does not meet their needs as well as another answer. “

For some families putting a home up for sale marks a deep and troublesome choice, but in certain instances a good honest assessment reveals that an attempted chapter 13 bankruptcy, modification or other effort to avoid foreclosure would just drain limited cash and delay the inevitable rather than provide a viable long term cure. Even reluctantly, these people may need to move a short sale to the top of their list of alternatives to save time, additional heartache and avoid a mortgage deficiency.

Short Sale’s wealth of information provides clear definitions pertaining to what is a short sale, and its sister sites offer additional assistance and guidance with help to stop home foreclosure, as well as how to obtain a deed in lieu of foreclosure when a short sale fails. Because there are number of ways to stop foreclosure, Financial Firebird’s goal is to provide all of the information up front so that homeowners are able to educate themselves and make the best choice for their situation.

About Short Sale

Short Sale and its sister sites aim to educate people homeowners with a potential foreclosure, and are affiliated with the Financial Firebird Corporation’s Bankruptcy Alternatives Group. The sites provide truly free information web resources with a goal of providing no cost information to consumers, allowing them to make the best decision based on their own individual case.

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Article source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/3/prweb10576564.htm

Stop Home Foreclosure Help Expands Its Information to Provide Even More … – Virtual

From before the first missed mortgage payment through the mortgage foreclosure process and the auction itself, Stop Home Foreclosure Help educates people as to what they should expect and the best ways to help keep their house.

Pittsfield, MA (PRWEB) March 25, 2013

Stop Home Foreclosure Help stands as a complete free information resource area for people with mortgage payment problems. While the site certainly helps people in foreclosure, the articles also endeavor to engage people prior to their first late payment to address issues before they become major troubles. Unlike most other sites about foreclosure, the Stop Home Foreclosure Help pages come with no hidden agenda or product. The sites aims to educate and guide home owners to the best solution for their own personal situations without trying to push any particular method which represents a business associated with the webpage. A former foreclosure prevention attorney who specialized in non-bankruptcy foreclosure prevention authored all FAQs and articles, including those on bankruptcy. As much as both home owners and banks may prefer avoiding bankruptcy in theory, often filing chapter 13 bankruptcy becomes the final and only option to stop foreclosure.

With a basic foreclosure FAQ and many articles on ways to adjust personal finances to stay out of mortgage trouble in the first place, site articles aim to keep a foreclosure from ever starting. An important and popular page debunks dangerous foreclosure myths that can lead to people losing their homes if they fail to know the real truth.

Those already late on payments may read about specific solutions for stopping foreclosure including mortgage loan modification, chapter 13 bankruptcy and even mortgage refinancing with bad credit if payments did not fall too far behind yet. Many people lose hope at the first legal notice from the bank, but until the final drop of the gavel from the auctioneer a homeowner may take advantage of many options for avoiding mortgage foreclosure.

In addition to specific help to stop foreclosure, several articles simply assist with the emotions faced by dealing with losing their home. From some of the psychological issues of people tackling any debt issue to interesting facts about why foreclosure can be worse than being a victim of a natural disaster from a personal point of view people can hopefully feel a bit stronger and not so alone about their battle.

People who still feel lost or desire a second opinion on the best way for them to proceed and keep their house may take advantage of a toll free number provided for a no cost consultation. When saving the home no longer remains a viable option an honest discussion may take palce about the best ways to give up the home such as through a short sale or deed in lieu of foreclosure.

Home foreclosure represents one of the most difficult challenges a person deals with in their lives. The best way to navigate it involves moving with all of the relevant knowledge one can possibly garner. The free articles and FAQs on the Stop Home Foreclosure Help site provide a tremendous resource to understand what is happening and respond at each stage of the foreclosure process in a way that achieves the goal of keeping the house.

About:

Stop Home Foreclosure Help stands as a part of the Bankruptcy Alternatives – Debtor’s Options family of financial information and tools web pages started in 1996 and currently offered by the Financial Firebird Corporation with a goal of providing consumers with free unbiased help from a former debt workout and bankruptcy lawyer in choosing the right path to a brighter economic future.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2013/3/prweb10539947.htm

Article source: http://www.virtual-strategy.com/2013/03/25/stop-home-foreclosure-help-expands-its-information-provide-even-more-material-people-lear

Avoid foreclosure workshop


Posted: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 11:53 am


Avoid foreclosure workshop

By Marinscope staff

marinscope.com

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0 comments

A workshop for homeowners who are behind on their mortgage payments and want to avoid foreclosure will be held by Fair Housing of Marin from 5 to 8 p.m. March 27 at 30 N. San Pedro Road, Conference Room 100.


Hosted by Fair Housing of Marin, the workshop will focus on strategies to protect and save your home.

To reserve a spot, call or email Christine Lam, 457-5025, ext. 107, christine@fairhousingmarin, by March 22.

on

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 11:53 am.

Article source: http://www.marinscope.com/news_pointer/news/article_a617a7f6-970f-11e2-b59a-0019bb2963f4.html